People urged to make tackling pollution a priority

Clean air campaign

People in the North East are being invited to find out more about pollution and what can be done to tackle it.

Councils in Gateshead, Newcastle and North Tyneside are talking to individuals, businesses and community organisations about plans being developed to improve air quality.

This is in response to a legal requirement which the government has placed on a number of councils - including the three North East authorities - to tackle air quality in places where levels of roadside nitrogen dioxide are expected to remain above legal limits in 2021.

In the North East these locations include a section of the A167 Central Motorway and Tyne Bridge and part of the A1058 Coast Road.

The three local authorities are holding a series of information sessions during November to discuss the challenges of tackling pollution and seek views on different measures which could be implemented.

The comments and feedback from people will be used, along with the results of analysis on the impact of different measures on air quality and traffic movements, to help identify a preferred option.

Cllr Arlene Ainsley, cabinet member for transport and air quality at Newcastle City Council, said: "We know that in many parts of our areas air quality is actually good.

"But there are some locations where pollution levels are unacceptably high and this is something we must all tackle.

"We're looking at a range of measures and we want to know what people think to help us identify the most appropriate solutions for our areas."

A series of events and engagement sessions are being held across the three council areas to give people a chance to discuss the issues and look at potential solutions.

Councils are inviting businesses, transport providers, community organisations and environmental groups to get involved.

Cllr John McElroy, cabinet member for environment and transport at Gateshead Council, said: "It is important that we understand what people in our areas think and how they might be affected by the different measures which could be used to help improve the quality of our air.

"We will be carrying out formal consultation in the new year before any final decisions are made but we are keen to start the conversation now so that we can find out people's views before we determine our preferred option.

"We are not alone in the North East in having to look at this issue. Other cities across the country are also having to implement measures to improve air quality in response to the government's legal directive."

Across the country, poor air quality is linked to around 40,000 early deaths a year, including hundreds across Newcastle, Gateshead and North Tyneside.

Evidence from the World Health Organisation shows that pollution is particularly dangerous to the health of the very young and very old, as well as those who are already living with long-term health conditions like asthma.

New research also suggests that people living in areas where there are high levels of pollution may be more at risk of developing dementia.

Government will assess plans submitted by councils to ensure they are effective, fair, good value and will deliver required improvements in the shortest possible time.

A formal public consultation will take place in early 2019 prior to any measures being finalised.

08 November 2018

People in the North East are being invited to find out more about pollution and what can be done to tackle it.

Councils in Gateshead, Newcastle and North Tyneside are talking to individuals, businesses and community organisations about plans being developed to improve air quality.

This is in response to a legal requirement which the government has placed on a number of councils - including the three North East authorities - to tackle air quality in places where levels of roadside nitrogen dioxide are expected to remain above legal limits in 2021.

In the North East these locations include a section of the A167 Central Motorway and Tyne Bridge and part of the A1058 Coast Road.

The three local authorities are holding a series of information sessions during November to discuss the challenges of tackling pollution and seek views on different measures which could be implemented.

The comments and feedback from people will be used, along with the results of analysis on the impact of different measures on air quality and traffic movements, to help identify a preferred option.

Cllr Arlene Ainsley, cabinet member for transport and air quality at Newcastle City Council, said: "We know that in many parts of our areas air quality is actually good.

"But there are some locations where pollution levels are unacceptably high and this is something we must all tackle.

"We're looking at a range of measures and we want to know what people think to help us identify the most appropriate solutions for our areas."

A series of events and engagement sessions are being held across the three council areas to give people a chance to discuss the issues and look at potential solutions.

Councils are inviting businesses, transport providers, community organisations and environmental groups to get involved.

Cllr John McElroy, cabinet member for environment and transport at Gateshead Council, said: "It is important that we understand what people in our areas think and how they might be affected by the different measures which could be used to help improve the quality of our air.

"We will be carrying out formal consultation in the new year before any final decisions are made but we are keen to start the conversation now so that we can find out people's views before we determine our preferred option.

"We are not alone in the North East in having to look at this issue. Other cities across the country are also having to implement measures to improve air quality in response to the government's legal directive."

Across the country, poor air quality is linked to around 40,000 early deaths a year, including hundreds across Newcastle, Gateshead and North Tyneside.

Evidence from the World Health Organisation shows that pollution is particularly dangerous to the health of the very young and very old, as well as those who are already living with long-term health conditions like asthma.

New research also suggests that people living in areas where there are high levels of pollution may be more at risk of developing dementia.

Government will assess plans submitted by councils to ensure they are effective, fair, good value and will deliver required improvements in the shortest possible time.

A formal public consultation will take place in early 2019 prior to any measures being finalised.

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