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Drivers reminded that Stop Means Stop

School Crossing Patrol

Gateshead Council have launched a campaign to remind motorists that they must stop when they see a School Traffic Patrol Officer raise their sign in the middle of the road.

The campaign has been launched following a number of near misses where School Crossing Patrol Officers or their 'lollipop sticks' were hit or almost hit when they stood in the middle of the road to allow people to cross.

Signage will be placed on lampposts at locations that have been identified as having a particular issue reminding motorists of the law and the seriousness of their actions if they fail to stop.

Every driver should remember that a raised stick at the side of the road means 'prepare to stop', and a school crossing patrol holding their stick with outstretched arms in the middle of the road means 'stop'; this has the same force as a red light.

John McElroy, Gateshead Council's Cabinet Member for Environment and Transport said:

"Our School Crossing Patrol Officers do a fantastic job in all weathers, they're there to keep children and adults safe and we owe it to them to make sure they're kept safe doing their job too.

"Fortunately, most drivers in Gateshead follow the rules and do stop when they are meant to, but there's a handful that don't, and they really are putting lives at risk. We hope this campaign reminds motorists of the potential seriousness of their actions.  Drivers need to be aware that if they see a raised lollipop stick in the middle of the road they must stop. It acts the same as a red light and if they're caught the penalties to motorists are the same."

School Crossing Patrol Officer Michelle Philipson who patrols in Bensham said: "I've had quite a few near misses, I've been clipped once on the arm and my stick has been knocked. It does make me feel nervous to get back on the road and it is quite terrifying when you stand there because sometimes it doesn't look like they're going to stop. Motorists need to slow down and pay more attention to the road."

Drivers are legally obliged to obey the School Crossing Patrol Sign under the Road Traffic Act 1988. The law states that as soon as a patrol raises their sign, even if they have not stepped into the road, drivers must be prepared to stop. Once the School Crossing Patrol is in the road displaying the sign, drivers must stop, and not proceed until the School Crossing Patrol and any accompanying children have cleared the road.

Anyone who is reported for not stopping will likely be prosecuted and could face a fine of up to £1,000 and three penalty points on their driving license.

 

School Crossing Patrol
29 January 2020

Gateshead Council have launched a campaign to remind motorists that they must stop when they see a School Traffic Patrol Officer raise their sign in the middle of the road.

The campaign has been launched following a number of near misses where School Crossing Patrol Officers or their 'lollipop sticks' were hit or almost hit when they stood in the middle of the road to allow people to cross.

Signage will be placed on lampposts at locations that have been identified as having a particular issue reminding motorists of the law and the seriousness of their actions if they fail to stop.

Every driver should remember that a raised stick at the side of the road means 'prepare to stop', and a school crossing patrol holding their stick with outstretched arms in the middle of the road means 'stop'; this has the same force as a red light.

John McElroy, Gateshead Council's Cabinet Member for Environment and Transport said:

"Our School Crossing Patrol Officers do a fantastic job in all weathers, they're there to keep children and adults safe and we owe it to them to make sure they're kept safe doing their job too.

"Fortunately, most drivers in Gateshead follow the rules and do stop when they are meant to, but there's a handful that don't, and they really are putting lives at risk. We hope this campaign reminds motorists of the potential seriousness of their actions.  Drivers need to be aware that if they see a raised lollipop stick in the middle of the road they must stop. It acts the same as a red light and if they're caught the penalties to motorists are the same."

School Crossing Patrol Officer Michelle Philipson who patrols in Bensham said: "I've had quite a few near misses, I've been clipped once on the arm and my stick has been knocked. It does make me feel nervous to get back on the road and it is quite terrifying when you stand there because sometimes it doesn't look like they're going to stop. Motorists need to slow down and pay more attention to the road."

Drivers are legally obliged to obey the School Crossing Patrol Sign under the Road Traffic Act 1988. The law states that as soon as a patrol raises their sign, even if they have not stepped into the road, drivers must be prepared to stop. Once the School Crossing Patrol is in the road displaying the sign, drivers must stop, and not proceed until the School Crossing Patrol and any accompanying children have cleared the road.

Anyone who is reported for not stopping will likely be prosecuted and could face a fine of up to £1,000 and three penalty points on their driving license.

 

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