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Anti-social activities to be made criminal offence in Gateshead

PSPOs montage

(Credit: Google images)

Late night car meets held at a popular car park, parking outside a Dunston primary and secondary school and allowing your dog to foul in public are some of the activities to be made a criminal offence in Gateshead.

Gateshead Council's Cabinet has agreed to implement four new Public Space Protection Orders to stop anti-social behaviour which is having a detrimental effect on residents' lives.

Following consultation, an order banning car meets and associated anti-social behaviour taking place at Mill Road car park at Gateshead Quays will take effect.

Nearby residents have reported problems with loud music, speeding, revving car engines and tooting horns late at night and into the early hours of the morning.

It is hoped introducing a protection order, similar to the one covering the Metro Centre retail car parks, will have the same effect and drive the car meets out.

A second protection order has been drawn up to improve the environment for everyone living, working and visiting Gateshead by making it an offence if owners do not pick up after their dog, don't put their dog on a lead when requested if out of control and don't keep their dog on a lead at all times in cemeteries and school sites.

Pupil safety as well as the concerns of residents have been taken into consideration for the third order, piloted for two years, which will stop unsafe and inconsiderate parking on Park Terrace and Market Lane in Dunston during school pick up and drop off times at Kingsmeadow and Dunston Hill schools.

The Council has received complaints of vehicles parking in bus stops, blocking driveways and causing obstructions that prevents pupils crossing the road safely. When the order comes into force it will mean drivers can no longer drop off in these streets between 8 and 9.30am and 2.30 to 4pm in term time. Drivers of children with physical disabilities or who hold Blue Badges will be exempt.

Finally, it is planned to block off the rear of Pensher Street East in Felling to prevent the area being used to fly-tip rubbish.

Anyone breaching the orders could be issued with a fine of up to £100 or be prosecuted, resulting in a fine of up to £1,000 if convicted.

Councillor Linda Green, Cabinet Member for Communities and Volunteering, which covers Community Safety said:

"Gateshead Council uses Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs) to reduce anti-social behaviour and dog fouling across the Borough. We've looked differently at how we can use legislation to tackle problems that are of real concern to members of the public and partners, where traditional tactics have not completely solved the problem.

"We consulted widely with the public and in particularly those residents affected by the proposed new orders and we were pleased to receive a high level of support for them.

"We anticipate they will be implemented later in the autumn and we hope they will help improve the quality of life for people in those communities."

PSPOs montage
18 September 2019

(Credit: Google images)

Late night car meets held at a popular car park, parking outside a Dunston primary and secondary school and allowing your dog to foul in public are some of the activities to be made a criminal offence in Gateshead.

Gateshead Council's Cabinet has agreed to implement four new Public Space Protection Orders to stop anti-social behaviour which is having a detrimental effect on residents' lives.

Following consultation, an order banning car meets and associated anti-social behaviour taking place at Mill Road car park at Gateshead Quays will take effect.

Nearby residents have reported problems with loud music, speeding, revving car engines and tooting horns late at night and into the early hours of the morning.

It is hoped introducing a protection order, similar to the one covering the Metro Centre retail car parks, will have the same effect and drive the car meets out.

A second protection order has been drawn up to improve the environment for everyone living, working and visiting Gateshead by making it an offence if owners do not pick up after their dog, don't put their dog on a lead when requested if out of control and don't keep their dog on a lead at all times in cemeteries and school sites.

Pupil safety as well as the concerns of residents have been taken into consideration for the third order, piloted for two years, which will stop unsafe and inconsiderate parking on Park Terrace and Market Lane in Dunston during school pick up and drop off times at Kingsmeadow and Dunston Hill schools.

The Council has received complaints of vehicles parking in bus stops, blocking driveways and causing obstructions that prevents pupils crossing the road safely. When the order comes into force it will mean drivers can no longer drop off in these streets between 8 and 9.30am and 2.30 to 4pm in term time. Drivers of children with physical disabilities or who hold Blue Badges will be exempt.

Finally, it is planned to block off the rear of Pensher Street East in Felling to prevent the area being used to fly-tip rubbish.

Anyone breaching the orders could be issued with a fine of up to £100 or be prosecuted, resulting in a fine of up to £1,000 if convicted.

Councillor Linda Green, Cabinet Member for Communities and Volunteering, which covers Community Safety said:

"Gateshead Council uses Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs) to reduce anti-social behaviour and dog fouling across the Borough. We've looked differently at how we can use legislation to tackle problems that are of real concern to members of the public and partners, where traditional tactics have not completely solved the problem.

"We consulted widely with the public and in particularly those residents affected by the proposed new orders and we were pleased to receive a high level of support for them.

"We anticipate they will be implemented later in the autumn and we hope they will help improve the quality of life for people in those communities."

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